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suppression. ari berman has focused much of his attention on an underreported story this election season, namely efforts to prevent americans from exercising their democratic right. on the ballot for the -- the battle for the ballot and hoped the issue may be backfiring on those who support it. a conversation with ari berman from "the nation" comin gup now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ari berman is a political correspondent for "the nation" and author of the book "herding donkeys." last year he wrote a piece called "the gop war on voting." much of what he wrote has come to fruition. he joins us from new york. good to have you on this program. >> i am a longtime admirer. thanks for ha
democracy, we are also very concerned that if there is a very close election or multiple close races in the upcoming election and it seems likely there will be, that if people don't trust the outcome, that is really bad for our democracy. >> rose: the president's debate and the political race when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with politics, governor romney was the clear winner last night in the first of the three presidential debates, his performance revived a campaign dogged by weakening poll numbers a candidate emerged that republicans hoped for, friends often describe but the electorate had yet to encounter. >> that was survey done of small businesses across the country, said what has been the effect of obama care on your hiring plans and three quarters of them said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million pe
.s. presidential election campaign enters a critical week. and the miracle at medinah. europe's golfers stage one of the sport's greatest comebacks in the ryder cup. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they call
hugo chavez faces a young challenger. >> the election marks a watershed moment for the world's second largest oil producing nation. and a critical supplier of crude oil to the u.s. its number one customer. >> woodruff: that'all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: carnegie corp >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more jobs, less unemployment. the september numbers offered the latest look into the u.s. economy, and the latest fuel for the fight over economic policy in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the presid
and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public encounters with venezuela's hugo chavez, with former cuban dictator fidel castro. the president of bolivia stood up after only six minutes of questioning by him. both ramos and celines both moderated the first bilingual presidential debate. and most recently with the meet the candidates forum. but perhaps they are best known for defending the rights of immigrants by reporting on their plight and giving a voice
election stage before. romney has the advantage of having simply debated more over the last year. so i think it's kind of an even stage there, but the situation is not comparable to reagan versus carter. the economic metrics when carter was running for re- election were extremely negative, much more negative than they are today, and just this last week, polls show that the pub has more confidence in the president's economic views and vision and program than romney. so he has lost the one advantage that he once had. secondly, there were a lot of independent, undecided voters in 1980 who had lost faith in carter and were just waiting to see if they could feel confidence in his challenger. there are so few independent voters. this is an election that's about mobilizing the bases. so going after the independent voter is not a big surprise. having said all that in the memo put out by david axelrod -- >> who is who? >> he's the campaign guru on the obama side. >> right. >> he points out that five of the last six challengers won the first debate. i think the temptation by the media is going t
winning a re-election versus romney, the challenger coming in and wing. and what happens is there is a divergence. health care in general tends to do okay if people think romney is going to be re-elected and that is overall. but health care really breaks down to the service providers like the hospitals. which would actually severely benefit quite a bit if obama care continued on as planned. but if we had someone like romney come and take over and you know do what he says to get rid of obama care the folks who provide service are certainly going to be adversely affected. the folks that provide insurance are going to be positively affected. we saw that effect today. it was very marked. >> susie: let's look at another sector because romney was talking a lot about how much he likes coal, both candidates mr. talking about energy independence and you look at how coal stocks did today, big gains there like arch coal, like alpha natural resources, is this a good place to put your money? >> well, i tell you this. it's early to be making bets on any sector and predicated against a
and the presidential election. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. but with millions of americans still out of work, we visit one company looking to solve that problem. we round out our job retraining coverage with goodwill. >> susie: and tonight's market monitor guest thinks the stock market rally has some life left in it. he's chuck carlson of horizon investment services. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: more americans are going back to work. the unemployment rate now stands at 7.8 percent. it's the first time in almost 4 years that this key measure of the job market has dropped below 8 percent. american businesses added 114,000 new jobs in september and the readings for july and august were revised higher. so, is the labor picture as good as it seems? erika miller takes a closer look at the data and what it says about the u.s. economy. >> reporter: 3-tenths of a percent does not seem like much. but, when it comes to the nation's unemployment rate, a 3- tenths of a percent drop is actually staggering. the unemployment rate now stands at 7.8 percent. that's the lowest level since january 2009, wh
rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. ma
. >> the american legislative exchange council, or alec. >> alec is a nationwide consortium of elected state legislators working side by side with some of america's most powerful corporations. they have an agenda you should know about, a mission to remake america, changing the country by, changing its laws, one state at a time. alec creates what it calls "model legislation," pro-corporate laws its members push in statehouses across the country. alec says close to a thousand bills, based at least in part on its models, are introduced each year and an average of 200 pass. this has been going on for decades, but somehow alec managed to remain the most influential corporate-funded, political organization you'd never heard of -- until a gun shot sounded in the florida night. >>> trayvon martin unarmed, but for a bag of candy and iced tea that he was carrying. >> you'll recall that the shooter in trayvon martin's death was protected at first by florida's so-called stand your ground law. that law was the work of the national rifle association. there's its lobbyist standing right beside governor jeb
central for this election. unemployment rose after barack obama became president, peaking at just over 10%. today's figure is the first time it has been under 8% for 44 months. >> this morning, we found out that the unemployment rate has fallen to its lowest level since i took office. [applause] >> the good news comes at the end of a bad week for the president where he was widely derided for a lackluster debate performance. now some feel he is back. >> we have made to much progress to return to the policies that led to the crisis in the first place. i cannot allow that to happen. i will not allow that to happen. that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. >> blaming unemployment on the president has been central to the case of republicans. >> under obama's economy, it is just not getting better. >> mitt romney told a rally that today's improvement did not mean much. >> the unemployment rate has come down very slowly but it has come down on the less. the reason is primarily due to the fact that more and more people have just stopped looking for work. i of
to predict consumer spending this holiday season. the big wild card is the presidential election. >> this is the most difficult year we've ever had to predict our forecast, because there's never been this level of uncertainty in terms of tax and spending policy really in our history. >> reporter: his organization, the national retail federation, is forecasting a 4.1% gain. but the international council of shopping centers is more cautious, predicting an increase of less than 3%. shoppertrak and deloitte fall in the middle. some of the differences can be blamed on conflicting economic signs. higher home prices and stock prices are boosting consumer confidence. >> people are always looking for something to give them a real sort of positive outlook, something to make them feel better. shopping is pretty much one thing to make most people feel better if they can. >> reporter: but job growth is weak, and food and gasoline prices are rising. with so much uncertainty, you can expect to see lots of holiday promotions. but tv ads will come later. >> in normal years, we'd already start to
's magness arena for the first of three election debates. tonight's encounter, moderated by the "newshour's" own jim lehrer, is to focus on domestic policy. the first half of the 90-minute face-off will be spent on the number one issue for most voters this year: the economy. joining us for the debate, and here with us now to preview what to expect tonight are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. gentlemen, welcome. the night is finally here. mark, no pressure, just 60 million people will be watching. what are you looking for from tonighta encounter? >> what i'm looking for, judy, is that the-- the candidate who understands of the two that the most important thing is not making a mistake but really making a point as to what his presidency would be about. i think both of them are geared because so much has been-- attention has been directed to gaffes in the past that affected or influenced, shamed the outcome, that impression. it's a magic moment. with no pundits, no prism of edtorm columnists, 60 million individuals sit down in a
investors back to a bit of follow tillity. we have the election, events in europe and certainly the eerntion season coming up. a lot of things that can cause the volatility we saw today. >> so was's your prediction for the dow and the s&p. the dow is a few hundred points away from reaching its record high from back in 2007, the 14,000 level. you think that's going to happen or not? >> no, i don't think we'll see new highs there and the s&p is only maybe 7% away. i don't think we'll see new highs there either. i think we'll hang on to most of the gapes that we've achieved so far this year. but it wouldn't surprise me to give a little bit back. remember profits are very lackluster, actually going to be down year-over-year as we get the third-quarter results in, and we have that looming fiscal cliff issue out there. you mentioned the fed but q e3 is helpful but if we go over the fiscal cliff it is like getting a flu shot before storming the beech at normandiz. >> susie: that's an interesting picture. talking about the fed, what was your take on what ben bernanke said today, that the economy is
in this election. there is going to be even more importance in the future. quarter of all americans under 18 are latino. canvassing in colorado, a swing state where the latino vote is hugely important. now, some are disappointed that he has not done more to help the illegal immigrants that come across the border. a few find this election a hard choice. >> we know that there is only one candidate that supports any kind of immigration reform that is of any real value and of course that is obama. romney would turn back any progress we have made. >> a lot of republicans see the hispanic vote as a huge prize. what has gone wrong? when ronald reagan said that latinos were naturally republican, he met that they were aspirational and socially conservative. mitt romney seems to turn them off. he backed a law in arizona which some said was racial profiling. he called for a high-tech fence along the mexican border and struck a hard note talking about illegal immigrants. >> the answer is self deportation, people decide that they can do better work here because they don't have legal documentation. >> the
'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. including for medicare t will drive the medicare trust fund out-- dry up the money by 2016. if what i think is going to
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> the following is a pbs election event. funding for this program was provided by: >> ifill: good evening, and welcome to special pbs "newshour" coverage of the first presidential debate between president barack obama and former governor mitt romney. i'm again ifil. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight's debate will be moderated by our own jim leerer and will start a little over a minute from now, from the magness arena. >> after the debate we'll talked to arrow shapiro and scott horsily in denver, and christina bellantony. >> woodruff: you can follow along online on our live stream and live plog. two very quick thoughts from mark and david. mark, it come downs to this. >> in a rare race it's become increasingly a referendum on the challenger rather than the incumbent. can the challenger mitt romney make this a referendum on the president. >> who has the toughest job? >> romney. maybe jim lehrer. format i love. much more demanding on jim but better for us. >> ifill: we're looking forward to what jim has to say tonigh
the election, he's saying that his big, bold idea is, "never mind." and the fact is that if you are lowering the rates the way you described, governor, then it is not possible to come up with enough deductions and loopholes that only affect high-income individuals to avoid either raising the deficit or burdening the middle class. it's... it's math. it's arithmetic. >> woodruff: with the first debate behind them, the president headed on to wisconsin, and romney to virginia. their next face-off comes october 16th in hempstead, new york. >> brown: we hone in now on some of the claims and counter-claims over taxes and the deficit. and for that we've asked back two economists who've joined us several times this election season. jared bernstein served as chief economist and adviser to vice president biden from 2009 to 2011. he's now a senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities. douglas holtz-akin is a former director of the congressional budget office. he was chief economics adviser to john mccain's presidential campaign and is now president of the american action forum, a policy
a very uncertain future. >> with every presidential election campaign here in the u.s. comes on entire business dedicated to promoting the candidate. anything, basically from badges, ribbons, posters, to the millions spent on television advertisements. now, from a mountain has gone under display online. it seems like those buttons have a long tradition. >> we are looking at 1952. this is an archive of presidential campaign memorabilia from 1952 until the present. >> vote for president johnson. >> we have about 400 commercials. we started off by going to the different presidential libraries and correcting videos and converting this to the digital files. you can jump to any election year. you can click on 1980. that will take you right to a page for ronald reagan vs. jimmy carter. the commercials are 30 seconds or a minute that they summarize what was going on in the campaign to tell us what the main issues are. they were not intended to last as a historical record or if you look at years and years later. these are really important historical archives. >> these were made for the obama ca
and their lack of any concern at all. we are going to have a $7 billion federal election cycle this time. that is a lot of money being raised and spent on the campaign. that is a lot of rich people talking in both parties. the democrats still have some heart in there but they still swing to a far to the right as far as i'm concerned, but the republicans, that is the whole meeting of the party is the super rich and those who can be distracted because the message that they are propounding would take america in such an awful direction. but both parties are too beholden to big money. neither party takes on vested interests. i agree is the audacity of hope if i could coin a phrase that in a second term, president obama would assess what happened in the first term, how much a true need of america was tripped up by powerful interests and would be prepared to take it on. we have had that in our history at various times. great reformist president. both parties -- theodore roosevelt on the republican side. franklin roosevelt pa on franklin rooseveltr on the democratic side. kennedy and johnson. we
of the labor party after the defeat in 2010 general election. but that job went to his brother, ed miliband, since leaving front line politics, david miliband has been busy and a member of parliament, since 2001, and continues in that role, he has a community organizing campaign, i am pleased to have him back on this program. >> very nice to be back. >> so what are you doing with your life? >> i try and be a better dad, that's to the best thing i have stepped up to but i 32 to stay up with foreign affairs, i thik it is important in this time in the west people are challenging us to withdraw from the world and just focus on our own local problems, i want to stay engaged in that and i work on some buying issues in the uk, unemployment with the youth is important and there is so much disaffection in politics i have launched this political organizing. > how is your brother do. >> he is doing great. >> why aren't you there now? >> because i think in my position i end up becoming a perpetual commentary where the media wants me commenting on him, and i was determined to go to the -- i have been f
'll walk you through some of the numbers you heard and some you didn't to explain where the election stands tonight. first number, that 7 .8%. this is thousand candidates responded. >> so it looks like employment is getting better. the truth is if the same share of people were participating on the work force today as on the day the president got elected, our unemployment rate would be around 11%. >> today's news should give us some encouragement. it shouldn't be an excuse for the other side to try to talk down the economy. just to try to score a few political points. gwen: on balance, 34 days out, what is the bigger deal? the worse deal? a bad debate or a good job number, dan? >> if president obama can turn around perceptions about the economy that ultimately will be a bigger deal. incumbent presidents have suffered through bad fist debates and been a table bounce back. if you have a really lousy economy it's tough to go against that. the interesting thing is that the obama campaign for months after one weak jobs number after another have always discounted the unemployment number. i think t
in the first of three debates before election day on november 6th. domestic policy was in focus during the 90-minute showdown at the university of denver. the platform gave govern romney an opportunity to reignite his campaign which has suffered some this summer. they sparred across a range of issues. >> there's a various done of small businesses across the country saying what's the effect of obamacare in your hiring plans. three quarters said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for two years fighting for obamacare instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> the irony is that we've seen this model work really well, in massachusetts. because govern romney did a good thing, working with democrats in the state to set up what is essentially the identical model, and as a consequence, people are covered there. it hasn't destroyed jobs. when govern romney stood on the stage with other republic
's hard to get excited sometimes about the presidential election here in california, where sort of feels like a foregone conclusion how the golden state is going to go. but this state is home to 11 house districts that are considered either competitive or close to competitive. and that's in the -- in the scheme of the democrats needing 25 seats if they're going to retake the house of representatives and perhaps reinstall nancy pelosi as speaker of the house. and some of those races are right here in northern california. you've got one of the very closest races in the state, actually, is where incumbent republican dan lundgren is being taken on for the second time but ami barra, the physician from elk grove. and the voter registration has changed in that district, due to redistricting and some very intensive voter registration drive on behalf of the democrats. they actually have a one percentage point lead in voter registration, which means that it is neck and neck, very close. there's been a lot of money dumped into this and other races by outside interests all over the country, the cham
had been ahead by four or five. in the polls. you could see a shift where we have a closer election. i would be a tiny bit surprised if romney pulled ahead based on this debate alone. but between that and something else -- we have jobs figures coming out on friday morning and two more debates and things that could develop. it put -- and put romney on a path where he has a comeback where is the opposite happen that he lost badly, then you might really eat at a october surprise for him to come back. >> there seems to be is some debate that this was the as debate america actually wanted. some people say it was too dry and some people they finally we have a serious discussion of economic policy. which one was? >> i think it was more substantive than some of the primary debates. the critique is and it's describing their plans and so forth, you can double up substance but not necessarily a substance containing an honest impression of what your card in arguments are. these are two guys who are very data-driven. i don't either of them is an ideologue, unnecessarily. i think you saw that come t
corruption. >> rose: and he's leaving-- there's a new election in 2014. he will be departing, we assume. >> yeah. and it's for the afghans to elect their leadership. but let me add to this that we have actually seen progress in the development of afghanistan. the economic growth is around 7% to 8% annually from low level, but it's quite impressive. more people have access to electricity. we see flourishing markets. the educational system has improved. eight million children go to school. more than one-third are girls. 30% of teachers are female teachers. the health situation is better. more health centers have opened. child mortality has decreased. life expectancy has increased in particular for women. so we have seen a lot of progress in afghanistan. >> rose: do you believe that there will be some success in closing down the sort of porousness of the afghan/pakistan border so the taliban forces, which have had a kind of safe haven can be closed? >> the border region is really a problem. and wherever we engage with the pakistani government or pakistani military we encourage them to step
've had 10 presidential elections with televised debates. in three of them one candidate went into the first debate leading and another candidate came out of the last debate leading much it's turnedded campaigns in 1960 and 1980 and in 2000. so it can be done but it's a high task for sure. >> remember, we've been campaigning or we haven't been campaigning but the candidates have been campaigning for six months now. >> woodruff: do you agree with susan that a debate can change the trajectory of a race? >> i do. i think it can but it doesn't... it wasn't automatically change a trajectory. something significant has to happen. one of the contestants, one of the debaters has to say something that produces a lot of controversy for two or three days or do something, whether it's a... make a face, look at his watch. something has to happen that the voters look at. it changes how they evaluate the candidate. judy, the way i would put it is everybody needs to take a collective breath after this and say, wait a minute, maybe i need to reassess the campaign. that's what the romney folks n
close to having, and we may have to look at that issue again after the election. would that have been the right medicine at the time not only to raise the debt ceiling but to get the economic recovery in a better place? >> they were focusing, i think, on deficit reduction without an awareness, i think, about how weak the economy was. that was the same problem with bowles simpson. if you look at bowles simpson it was predicated on a fairly quick recovery of the economy. pay no attention to the turmoil going on in europe. the slowdown in asia. and if their prediction of, you know -- >> those two things are connected. >> yeah, exactly. >> the less demand in europe is affecting the slowdown in china. >> and we're in a globalized world where those two slowdowns effect us. so if they have been right that global growth was strong and american economy would have-- was going recover strongly, then that would have been a time to try to put our fiscal house in order, you know. >> you think the majority of the economists are on the side of stiglitz and krugman and others are on the side of people
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)